How to manage your reputation online (3 of 4)

Developing a strong online profile

You’ve registered social media accounts in your name. And you are listening to what people are saying about you online. But that’s not enough to protect your reputation. You also need to establish a strong profile so that positive links to content you control show up when people search for your name. It’s not that hard. But it does take some structured effort.

Your social media accounts

It isn’t sufficient to have a social media account with no content. A Twitter account with no tweets could damage your reputation (have you got nothing to say of interest?) and a LinkedIn page with no information certainly won’t help your employment prospects.

So the first thing to consider is how you are going to make you social media profiles credible. The basics are obvious: make sure you have a good profile picture (no Twitter “eggs” please!); and make sure you attend carefully to what your profiles say about you. If you don’t have the time or energy to fill out full profiles for all those social media accounts you have registered, choose one to complete carefully and then link the other profiles to it.

But you also need a regular stream of content. Now, if you are using social media for marketing you will want to think carefully about the content you write for each of your accounts. But we are doing this simply for reputation management so it doesn’t matter particularly if the content in various different accounts is the same. Rather than cutting and pasting your posts from Facebook to LinkedIn and Google+, you can use a service like BufferApp to schedule and distribute your posts to multiple social media accounts. That way you have have several active social media accounts without writing content separately for each one.

Your website

In the first post in this series, I suggested registering a URL in your name perhaps using the suffix .me if it is available. If you do this you might as well also build a small website containing your resume. (If you are not comfortable with this then head for CodeAcademy where you can learn how to programme a simple website: it is much easier than you might imagine.)

If you are comfortable with coding html, then it is important to remember that your website should be “mobile friendly” as Google will rank it higher if it is. Use a template to help you: there are plenty online but you could try Proweb Design’s Simple Responsive Template.

And if you are really competent with coding then you will implement “rich snippets” on your website using schema.org data. Find out more about rich snippets here. Using rich snippets will make your website more strongly on search results page, simply because more content will be shown.

If you have a  common name then it is unlikely that you will see it on the first page of Google (take a look at what comes up when you search for “John Smith” – it’s not ordinary people). If that is the case then perhaps there is less reason for reputation management purposes to create your own website – although it might be useful in other ways.

Wikipedia

If you are running a business it is reasonable to consider developing a page on Wikipedia. Remember though that Wikipedia is NOT the place for self-promotion. The site enforces a strict “Neutral Point of View” policy that means only facts based on valid sources can be published.

Unless you are running a reasonably sized business or are in some way a prominent person it is probably unnecessary to have a Wikipedia page. Indeed there are disadvantages to having one. As the site is strictly neutral anything bad about you that can be verified can be added to the page. So if you have been to prison recently you might not want to create a page… Wikipedia gives an excellent explanation of why it is not always a good thing to have a Wikipedia page.

Remember also that even if you write a page about yourself it may not be published. Wikipedia requires pages to be about content that has “significant coverage in reliable sources”. If you cannot provide links to this type of coverage then your page may be declined as “non-notable”.

Whether or not you have a Wikipedia page it is important to monitor it: if you are being mentioned on the site then you will want to check out whether the facts given are true. If they are, and they are damaging, then you won’t be able to do much about it, although you may be able to add some additional verifiable facts that are more favourable to you.

Blogs and discussions

It is pointless thinking about blogging unless you are prepared to put some energy into it. That means having a regular stream of content. You don’t have to post content every day. But it should be at least once a month for your blog to have any credibility. Use a site like Tumblr or WordPress to host your blog and you immediately benefit from the popularity of those sites.

Don’t confine yourself to your own blog as you build up your profile though. Identify some key blogs in your industry in or areas you are interested in and follow them, contributing your own comments to them as appropriate. How to find them? Well, back in the day, when the web was smaller, there were a number of blog directories. With so many blogs published, most existing directories tend to focus on particular areas. Google “Blog [area of interest]” and you will probably be lucky. Or go straight to a search engine that specialises in blogs like Icerocket.

As well as blogs, find other places you can leave comments or join discussions: popular media websites for instance, or community sites.

Other platforms

Think creatively about other platforms you could use. Look for popular websites that have a good reach as these will rank highly. Are there any societies or industry bodies you can join: if there are do they have a place where you can write a personal or business profile? For instance I belong to the Institute of Consulting which enables me to publish a profile about my services on a reasonably prominent website. And if you are running a business you might want to put a review of working for your company on a site like Glassdoor.

Google and Google+

One last thing to consider: Google. Make sure you make it as easy as possible for Google to find you and to rank your pages highly. This means having a Google+ presence with a good “headshot” photograph: this is helpful if you want to stand out in search results. Google used to use the photo in search results and while it no longer does this, your photo can still appear on the right of the screen as part of a mini profile that Google will create. You should also implement  Google “authorship” on your website and your blogs: it’s not the easiest thing in the world although perfectly achievable and there are several good guides on how to do it such as this from Searchengineland.

Next time…

So far we have talked about registering appropriate URLs and social media profiles, listening to what people say about you online, and establishing a strong profile. But what do you do if people start trying to damage your reputation? You will have to wait for my next post for that!

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One thought on “How to manage your reputation online (3 of 4)

  1. Pingback: Mobile Social Consumers | How to manage your reputation online (4 of 4)

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